A lovely compilation of whatever floats my boat. May include copious amounts of privilege-questioning and social justice reblogging, random ballet photos, and things I think are pretty. Or funny. Or cool.
Also, here is a general Trigger Warning. I try to make sure I tag posts, but proceed with caution in case. :)

 

The racial and ethnic demographics of the Don’t Say Gay polling are of interest, too. 75% of those who identified as Hispanic said that teachers should be able to discuss other sexual orientations; 60% of Black respondents gave that answer; only 46% of White respondents thought so. And this is interesting to me because so many white liberals whisper to me: “You know, the Black community is so conservative on these issues.” Yeah, I don’t know anything of the kind. These anti-gay bills in TN come from a segment of the White community.

Chris Sanders (from the Tennessee Equality Project)

(Source: data3.tennessean.com)

mightybearfalconlives:

sourcedumal:

strugglingtobeheard:

high-priestess-jezebel:

rebelion-silenciosa:

blackjahjah:

This video is revelatory.

white people ain’t got no manners

lots of poc in there too

everyone needs to watch this.

Antiblack misogyny. The first perpetrators are white women. Two white women battling it out at the same time to get their antiblack misogyny in, and then one smiling to the other and apologizing for knocking over the other because she “had to get her shot.”

Third person to take a picture is a white woman. Who turns and, as the caption says, “happily shares her shot” [smiling and showing it to the white man behind her].

Two WoC (one black) see her, have no reaction.

The fourth picture was another white woman. This time she has a camera, not a camera phone. None of these white women have talked to this black woman, none of them have asked. All of them have taken her picture from behind, eagerly like they just can’t miss their shot. This is not even three minutes in.

Mind you, this person is walking to get to a museum exhibit on free admission day. That’s it. She’s walking in a loose yellow jumpsuit with a comfortable fit, her hair is done in lovely loc’d ringlets, she is wearing heels, she has on light and lovely makeup. She’s not an exhibit, she’s a person- but you’d never know it by the way she’s been treated just walking down the street to one building over, and up two escalators to an exhibit. Just in the first not even three minutes.

A few stares a points by white couples (initiated by women). Picture 5 is taken by a white woman.

One white woman complimented her on her outfit, she captioned this as her second compliment of the day (the first being a white receptionist at the beginning).

Minute 5:14, she goes for a bathroom break. She views what is currently collected from the footage, and for the first time discovers that people had been taking pictures of her without her consent (a fact she was unaware of until that moment).

Minute 5:55 caption: “at this point I lost track of how many pictures were taken.”

6:56: “I feel so comfortable, so I decide to walk to the lobby for a second time (more pictures are taken).”

Minute 7:02: I see someone wearing a red shirt with black stripes, very similarly to the jumpsuit’s pattern. It occurs to me that had she been wearing the jumpsuit as a shirt, and fitted jeans (you know clothes everyone wears) that this would still be her experience. Because she has a noticeable ass, and she’s black, and she’s existing.

7:28 caption: “She’s taken picture number 12 or 15???”

 7:30-8 caption: “The gift shop was amazing easy to walk through. People are too busy shopping to look at you. (So I lingered there for a bit).”

[Bold mine. Think about that. Think about lingering a gift shop because people aren’t making you their exhibit. Think about lingering at a gift shop to get a break from not being a person at a museum, a break from being other people’s (white people who get to be people) exhibit].

8:30 caption: Then it was time to go look at one more exhibit. Plus I wanted to visit their sculpture garden which I love.

Bold reminder that this is a human being and she is looking at an art museum on free admission day like everyone else. She is a human being looking at art, and wanting to see some art that she particularly loves. Let that sink in, non black people (and especially white people).

8:47: More people in stripes, more people in tight shorts. It is not about the way she’s dressing. I repeat: IT IS NOT ABOUT THE WAY SHE IS DRESSING. It is her blackness, and her womanhood (note: antiblack misogyny denies humanity; desexualizes and hypersexualizes; and defeminizes; womanhood is denied, any protection experienced via white womanhood does not exist, but all the brunt of it does).

8:55 caption: “I pause again near another bathroom and talk to my friend who is filming. I am emotionally tired now." [Bold mine].

9:01: “Hmm. Interesting. Okay so I’m going to go to the third floor for real now.”

9:05 “Do you want a post card?” (I shopped while filming). Blaring reminder she is a person!

9:11 caption: (Friend): “This works too! Just standing here… [and film reactions].”

9:48: A white couple walks by, one of the couple turns around pointedly to get a last look (at her ass). The second half has a camera, but did not take pictures. The camera pans to a second person who has a camera phone and is taking a picture. Their expression is intent on getting their shot. (She is across the room, looking at art- as she has been the entire time, just existing).

9:57: An Asian person takes a picture and walks away, it cannot be determined if the picture was of her backside until the ten minute mark, when the friend who is filming stands in the exact same spot, and maneuvers to face the same direction: She’s revealed to be the very clear subject, not the artwork.

10:08-20: More people in stripes, more people in tight clothes. More people not being treated like an exhibit. The overwhelming majority are non-black, the majority are also white.

10:26: Another white person lines up to take a picture of her. This time the filmer is behind them, and you can clearly see her on their screen preview. The way they hold their camera is in the same manner they would caption a thing, a thing in the museum.

10:39 caption: “There is a lot less reaction in the quieter gallery areas”

[My thoughts: people feeling less confident in overt antiblack misogyny when they’re not in groups, and therefor they themselves cannot blend in with a shield of whiteness, and paleness).

10:48: A white man snaps a photo with his phone, a child is tugging on his shirt and looking up at him for some attention. It is not clear if the photo is of her.

11:29 caption: Time to head outside.

11: 34: A white woman takes a picture with her zoom in, the angles are too off to confirm who she took a picture of, however as the camera pans to the right, we see there’s really no one else for her to be taking a picture of, except of a black woman. If you look in the window during the pan you see another white woman with a camera phone. hear voices during the pan right. “Nobody’s invisible, people are like-“

Minute 11:40 caption: This girl came up to apologize after being asked why she took my picture.

11:48 caption: Naturally this led to a conversation about the project.

11:55 caption: She was the only one to apologize throughout the whole project.

[I would also like to point out that she was confronted, and had she not been I doubt we would have a measly “only one” to point to].

12:07: As they are talking, a desi man and a woman (race undetermined, could be white, could be pale desi) take her photo. The couple stop, turn, and the woman walks out while the man aims his camera with one hand.

12:07 caption: Note I am the background in their photo.

[My note: because she is being photographed from the side, they are getting a clear side view of her ass, for their entertainment].

12:30:  It is now clear that the woman is also desi.

12:41: The couple is filmed walking away. They take no other photos.

12:44: We see a pale man (race undetermined)- he could be white, he could be East Asian) with a white woman rummaging through her satchel. He looks to the white woman before continuing to stare at the black woman. He appears to be gesturing with his head about the black woman in a “get a load of this” manner, treating her a spectacle.

12:55 caption: It’s taking her FOREVER to get her camera out! Bad nerves maybe?

13: 09 caption [Two East Asian women walking by, one is head to toe in loose purple fabric] : Notice this woman with the purple scarf. She seems not to notice me.

[The second woman says something while smiling, dialogue undetermined]

13:19: A white couple is casually walking, the woman is holding a camera. For a split second I really thought she wouldn’t take a picture. Of course, she does.

13:22: She transitions her camera up smoothly, in practiced manner of capturing a thing, an object, the man’s posture doesn’t change, showing that this picture taking, this overt antiblack misogyny and dehumanization perpetrated by this white woman is completely normalized.

13: 25: He begins to walk forward, as if bored or annoyed by her taking too long. She trails behind him, having gotten his shot.

[Note me: kind of how you’d walk off slightly irritated when someone’s taking too long to get a picture of an exhibit…]

13:32: She’s still talking to the white woman they confronted.

13:37 caption: The woman with the purple scarf is now back to take a picture.

[You can see the preview screen on her camera, it shows the black woman clearly. She is the only/main view of the camera, and it’s zoomed in to make the shot mainly her entire body].

13:51 caption [still talking to white woman who was confronted]: Finally we decide to exchange information and then it is time to leave the museum.

14:04 caption: I wander a bit before exiting…
14:04 caption cont’: I’m having fun at this point.

14:54 caption [a black man approaches, he’s dressed professionally: One security guard had interesting things to say. Dinner was made an option.

15:03 caption: Funny, he forgot meeting me in regular clothing two days before. [Bold mine]

[Me: Another thing about antiblack misogyny: You are invisible. You are either hyper-visible [and hyper-sexualized], and in danger. Or you are invisible, and also in danger]

15:19: A white man fiddles with the positioning of his camera as he nonchalantly determines what kind of picture of her he shall take. His expression is bored, his actions entitled. Bored entitlement.

15:24: The filmer angles so as to see the screen preview. It is clearly of her, zoomed in for entire body, though some of her foot is cut from the picture preview. He continues taking pictures as she’s walking away, this time his pictures are clearly zoomed in on her butt, and also gets some breasts. Whether he gets her face is clearly of no consequence.

15:38 caption: And then my day at MoMa comes to an end.

15:42 Closing Credits:

Special thank you to Morvarid Shahidi, Gina Im, and the Museum of Modern Art.

Body suit by Butch Diva

www.butchdiva.bigcartel.com

Holster fanny pack by Yana Handbags

www.yanahandbags.com

15:45: YANA in a Body Suit Productions 2012

———

This is the reality of being a black woman, a black femme, and a black perceived-woman. If you do anything, anything, you are not a person. You are a side show and people have the right to be entertained! They will apologize to the white folk they knocked out of the way to get their picture rather than acknowledge a word of personhood to your face! You don’t HAVE a face! You’re just ass. White supremacy has a history dating into the early-mid 1900s of having black people in fucking zoos for their entertainment. This isn’t new! This isn’t new! This is a legacy. This is the legacy of whiteness and no white person is exempt.

Not white women, who are the initiators and main perpetrators of this because (as my friend said) they see her as a threat; not white men, who are indeed just as guilty; not white non-binaries, not white queers (your other axis of oppression do not and will not ever negate your whiteness). No one is exempt from the legacy that made this possible, that allows this to go on unchecked, that is still actively held up by the people who would fancy themselves passive, or “good people.” 

It doesn’t matter how you dress. This isn’t just about being fat, this isn’t just about being skinny- this is about not being white, this is about existing in blackness.

You see white people of all shapes and sizes in this video. NONE of them are side shows, NONE of them are experiencing the sheer white gaze of antiblackness and antiblack misogyny. And this is about blackness. This is about being perceived in such a manner that other people only feel the need an “excuse” to dehumanize you: something they do already in the comfort of their homes, in their minds. You know this because not a single white person reprimanded another white person for their picture taking. Not one alerted her after said non-existent reprimand.This is what I worry about when I go out. I don’t even know if people are taking pics, and I pray they are not.

i couldn’t even watch it all, thank you for all the captions and notes. because 5 minutes in i was getting sick. those stares, those feelings. and i’m not as tall or shapely as that woman but its not even about that at all, for us perceived black women, its not that at all. thanks for breaking it all down. maybe i will watch more later.

They used her body like an exhibit.

I am SO FUCKING SICK.

So sick.

Fuck all of them.

wow…

(Source: blackjatovia)

Sweet and Tender Hooligan: Would this be rude

movethefuckoverbro:

Im a guy, I like to sit comfortably and spread my knees a bit, not because im a macho man tryna oppress womyn, but because im tired. and i need to relax. if a woman were to request for me to sit properly so she could sit, i would have no problem sitting properly, women…

rape tw

mightybearfalconlives:

deadsexual:

henthark:

I wonder how many rape victims have been told “I know you want it” and worked towards recovery only to have their rapist’s words spat back out at them over the radio in the form of a “sexy” pop song

THANKYOUTHANKYOUTHANKYOUTHANKYOUTHANKYOUTHANKYOUTHANKYOUTHANKYOUTHANKYOUTHANKYOUTHANKYOUTHANKYOU

image

strangeasanjles:

Until recently, I have had a tremendous amount of shame about the bullying I experienced as a child.
Whenever something would happen and my mother would find out, she would yell at me and say,
"Why didn’t you fight back?! What are you doing to make them treat you like that?"
So I felt like it was my fault.
(x)

Her face in that fourth gif broke my heart.  I love this woman.

(Source: feyminism)

palestinianliberator:

sandandglass:

The Daily Show explains Western imperialism in the Middle East. 

This is probably the most accurate and concise summary of why the Middle East has been in such chaos since the first World War

seekingwillow:

bankuei:

jadedcattybrownbitch:

brainstatic:

Is something not about your dick? Make it about your dick! Don’t let her do anything without reminding her that you have a dick.

omfg really?
Do people really think this is a turn on?
Is this what flirting is?
I hope dipshits who actually try this line gets hot tea thrown in their face.

wait, what?
You’re going to give up talking about delicious TEA to make some shitty come-on line?
Muthafucka you do not deserve to drink tea.  
Either you’re giving wack tea in which case you deserve no love or attention or you’re disrespecting good tea in which case you deserve even less love and attention.
But also: are these dudes learning their hollers from pornos? WTF.

___

seekingwillow:

bankuei:

jadedcattybrownbitch:

brainstatic:

Is something not about your dick? Make it about your dick! Don’t let her do anything without reminding her that you have a dick.

omfg really?

Do people really think this is a turn on?

Is this what flirting is?

I hope dipshits who actually try this line gets hot tea thrown in their face.

wait, what?

You’re going to give up talking about delicious TEA to make some shitty come-on line?

Muthafucka you do not deserve to drink tea.  

Either you’re giving wack tea in which case you deserve no love or attention or you’re disrespecting good tea in which case you deserve even less love and attention.

But also: are these dudes learning their hollers from pornos? WTF.

___

theflightofthephoenix:

Today is the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.  Fifty years ago today Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his epic “I Have A Dream” speech. Many of his dreams have come true, and for that we are all truly grateful, but there is one often overlooked area of our society that seems to have fallen into the shadow of his dream: our book shelves.
 Last fall my mom and I were invited to sell our young adult novel The Enchanted Cottage of Oceania: An American Fairytale at a local town’s annual festival.  Girls (and boys) of all ages from middle school to college, from homemakers to executives have listened to our story and have shared it with their friends on Facebook, Twitter, and other social media.  The humorous yet sometimes chilling adventures of fourteen-year-old identical twins Harper and Leigh Reynolds (named for the author of To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee) have captivated crowds in D.C., Maryland, and Virginia.  Our audiences have been racially diverse, and no one of any race has hesitated to delve into our story that is narrated by adolescent girls who are witty, smart, and often scared to death of the misadventures that await them as they try to rescue their father who has been abducted by Other World magic.  Several non-minority customers have quietly applauded us for writing a novel with a multicultural cast. One older woman actually exclaimed “Good!” as she pointed at the cover of the book before whispering, “It is time for this.”
Standing firmly on the foundation of several sold-out Barnes and Noble book signings, we felt confident enough to tell the reason why we wrote a story with African American female leads.  We want girls of all ethnic backgrounds to see themselves as capable, intelligent, and resourceful.  Having seen our flyers and posters, and having listened to our well-crafted pitch, people have assumed that a mainstream publisher is coaching us, representing us, and marketing our work.  They have no idea that we’ve written, edited, and self-published all on our own. Self-publishing is certainly a growing, and more acceptable, phenomenon among writers who have a passionate desire to share their work with an immediacy that does not typically occur when trying to sell it to an agent or publishing house.  The book has been well-received, but politely rejected. Lurking in the shadows (like one of the ghosts in our book) was an unspoken question: Is there really a young adult audience for a novel with African-American leads?
One reviewer (from a mainstream publication) questioned whether it was realistic to have such “attractive” characters who had attained such a high financial status. Beyond seeing the remarks as childishly offensive, the comments begged a reciprocal question of how many reviews are written about non-minority characters that challenge the veracity of those characters’ social status, physical attractiveness, or purpose?   I’ve read commentary that the fictitious Huxtable family was met with similar disclaimers when The Cosby Show was first aired, but I would have hoped that thirty years later that particular battle had been fought and won. Growing up, aside from reading African folklore, I can count on one hand the number of fantasy (or even contemporary) stories that featured people of color.  As a 25-year old, I can attest that my favorite novels about African Americans involved bygone eras of slavery and segregation, and few, if any, ever described the characters as being attractive. If you think that this does not matter to a child’s development and self-esteem, then there needs to be a revisiting of the infamous psychological findings of the ‘Clark baby doll tests’ that were part of Brown v. Board of Education, that showed with alarming consistency how black children did not see themselves as worthy, smart, or beautiful. I loved reading, and of course still do, but all of the characters that were described as beautiful, interesting, and clever were not minorities whereas the characters that were struggling, suffering, and in constant trouble with the judicial system looked like me. 
 And that brings me to the raison d’etre for The Enchanted Cottage of Oceania series. My mother’s best friend was living abroad for work. She could rarely find American books for her then pre-teen daughter so we would send her our favorites. Nancy Drew was a regular shipment, and her daughter devoured the series. One day the mother asked us to find a similar series that featured a girl of color as the lead character. We took up the challenge and scoured our local libraries and bookstores. We enlisted help, but found absolutely nothing to satisfy her request. There were stories about growing up as the daughter of a pastor, and shelves featuring tales about growing up impoverished in urban environments or newly freed from slavery, but not one novel permitted a little girl of color to see herself on the cover of the book about a girl having a grand adventure, falling in love with a prince, or running off on a magical quest. After delivering the news, she gave us one last task. “Write it!”, she demanded.  “Write the book my daughter has been waiting for.” And so we did and are on Book Four of the series.
All authors want to be heard.  All writers want to be read.  We get that.  F. Scott papered his wall with rejection notices and sour reviews.  However, for every failed F. Scott there is a Faulkner or a Hemingway.  Non-minority readers of all ages get to swim in a virtual pool of American literature that shapes their worlds and feeds their fantasies.  But what about minority readers?  Try scanning the modern bookshelves and see what fare you discover on which to nibble.  The question is one that has haunted Martin Luther King, Jr. and Thurgood Marshall, and W.E.B. duBois for more than half a century.  How does the United States of America, in all of its glorious multiculturalism, look at itself for what it truly is?  E pluribus unum  - from many, one.  A question lingers in my mind as I close this blog – if someone like George Zimmerman had read books like ours where the young African American boys and men are smart and good and brave, would he have been so afraid of Trayvon Martin?  Literature is a powerful tool and it is for that reason that I am prepared (with my mother) to fight for the hearts, minds, and souls of American children and young adults because they have the right (and we have the responsibility) to show how wonderfully imaginative ALL people are capable of being.

theflightofthephoenix:

Today is the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.  Fifty years ago today Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his epic “I Have A Dream” speech. Many of his dreams have come true, and for that we are all truly grateful, but there is one often overlooked area of our society that seems to have fallen into the shadow of his dream: our book shelves.

 Last fall my mom and I were invited to sell our young adult novel The Enchanted Cottage of Oceania: An American Fairytale at a local town’s annual festival.  Girls (and boys) of all ages from middle school to college, from homemakers to executives have listened to our story and have shared it with their friends on Facebook, Twitter, and other social media.  The humorous yet sometimes chilling adventures of fourteen-year-old identical twins Harper and Leigh Reynolds (named for the author of To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee) have captivated crowds in D.C., Maryland, and Virginia.  Our audiences have been racially diverse, and no one of any race has hesitated to delve into our story that is narrated by adolescent girls who are witty, smart, and often scared to death of the misadventures that await them as they try to rescue their father who has been abducted by Other World magic.  Several non-minority customers have quietly applauded us for writing a novel with a multicultural cast. One older woman actually exclaimed “Good!” as she pointed at the cover of the book before whispering, “It is time for this.”

Standing firmly on the foundation of several sold-out Barnes and Noble book signings, we felt confident enough to tell the reason why we wrote a story with African American female leads.  We want girls of all ethnic backgrounds to see themselves as capable, intelligent, and resourceful.  Having seen our flyers and posters, and having listened to our well-crafted pitch, people have assumed that a mainstream publisher is coaching us, representing us, and marketing our work.  They have no idea that we’ve written, edited, and self-published all on our own. Self-publishing is certainly a growing, and more acceptable, phenomenon among writers who have a passionate desire to share their work with an immediacy that does not typically occur when trying to sell it to an agent or publishing house.  The book has been well-received, but politely rejected. Lurking in the shadows (like one of the ghosts in our book) was an unspoken question: Is there really a young adult audience for a novel with African-American leads?

One reviewer (from a mainstream publication) questioned whether it was realistic to have such “attractive” characters who had attained such a high financial status. Beyond seeing the remarks as childishly offensive, the comments begged a reciprocal question of how many reviews are written about non-minority characters that challenge the veracity of those characters’ social status, physical attractiveness, or purpose?   I’ve read commentary that the fictitious Huxtable family was met with similar disclaimers when The Cosby Show was first aired, but I would have hoped that thirty years later that particular battle had been fought and won. Growing up, aside from reading African folklore, I can count on one hand the number of fantasy (or even contemporary) stories that featured people of color.  As a 25-year old, I can attest that my favorite novels about African Americans involved bygone eras of slavery and segregation, and few, if any, ever described the characters as being attractive. If you think that this does not matter to a child’s development and self-esteem, then there needs to be a revisiting of the infamous psychological findings of the ‘Clark baby doll tests’ that were part of Brown v. Board of Education, that showed with alarming consistency how black children did not see themselves as worthy, smart, or beautiful. I loved reading, and of course still do, but all of the characters that were described as beautiful, interesting, and clever were not minorities whereas the characters that were struggling, suffering, and in constant trouble with the judicial system looked like me. 

 And that brings me to the raison d’etre for The Enchanted Cottage of Oceania series. My mother’s best friend was living abroad for work. She could rarely find American books for her then pre-teen daughter so we would send her our favorites. Nancy Drew was a regular shipment, and her daughter devoured the series. One day the mother asked us to find a similar series that featured a girl of color as the lead character. We took up the challenge and scoured our local libraries and bookstores. We enlisted help, but found absolutely nothing to satisfy her request. There were stories about growing up as the daughter of a pastor, and shelves featuring tales about growing up impoverished in urban environments or newly freed from slavery, but not one novel permitted a little girl of color to see herself on the cover of the book about a girl having a grand adventure, falling in love with a prince, or running off on a magical quest. After delivering the news, she gave us one last task. “Write it!”, she demanded.  “Write the book my daughter has been waiting for.” And so we did and are on Book Four of the series.

All authors want to be heard.  All writers want to be read.  We get that.  F. Scott papered his wall with rejection notices and sour reviews.  However, for every failed F. Scott there is a Faulkner or a Hemingway.  Non-minority readers of all ages get to swim in a virtual pool of American literature that shapes their worlds and feeds their fantasies.  But what about minority readers?  Try scanning the modern bookshelves and see what fare you discover on which to nibble.  The question is one that has haunted Martin Luther King, Jr. and Thurgood Marshall, and W.E.B. duBois for more than half a century.  How does the United States of America, in all of its glorious multiculturalism, look at itself for what it truly is?  E pluribus unum  - from many, one.  A question lingers in my mind as I close this blog – if someone like George Zimmerman had read books like ours where the young African American boys and men are smart and good and brave, would he have been so afraid of Trayvon Martin?  Literature is a powerful tool and it is for that reason that I am prepared (with my mother) to fight for the hearts, minds, and souls of American children and young adults because they have the right (and we have the responsibility) to show how wonderfully imaginative ALL people are capable of being.

When someone works for less pay than she can live on—when, for example, she goes hungry so you can eat more cheaply and conveniently—than she has made great sacrifices for you, she has made you a gift of some part of her abilities, her health, and her life. The "working poor,"[…]are in fact the major philanthropists of society. They neglect their own children so that the children of others will be cared for; they live in substandard housing so that other homes will be shiny and perfect; they endure privation so that inflation will be low and stocks will be high. To be a member of the working poor is to be an anonymous donor, a nameless benefactor, to everyone else.

Nickel and Dimed - Barbra Ehrenreich pg 221 (via gorawickid)

College Major Stereotypes:

dem-queer-animals:

dotluvr:

chrybo:

Philosophy: 

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Art:

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Engineering:

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Chemistry:

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Psychology:

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Gender and Sexuality Studies:

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Social Work:

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Women’s Studies:

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Business:

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Linguistics:

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English:

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Computer Science and Engineering:

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Theater: 

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Physics:

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Mathematics: 

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Astronomy:

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Environmental Studies: 

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Biology:

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Anthropology:

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Sociology:

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International Studies:

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A+ accuracy

(Source: leafmotif)

Britain may be a small island but I would challenge anyone to find a country with a prouder history, a bigger heart or greater resilience. Britain is an island that helped to abolish slavery, that has invented most of the things worth inventing, including every sport currently played around the world. If I go on too long about our literature, our art, our philosophy, our contribution, including of course the world’s language — if I start talking about this ‘blessed plot, this sceptred isle, this England’ I might have to put it to music, so I think I’ll leave it there.

British prime minister David Cameron, in response to an alleged anonymous Russian diplomat referring to Britain as “a small island”.

Oversensitive much, Cameron? For a national leader to react with such defensive public fervour to an anonymous rumour? What a bunch of malarkey. Every country across the globe is proud of its history, heart, and resilience, as they should be — but few have caused as much human violence and suffering as Britain. Ask their neighbours, the Irish. 

Abolition of slavery? The rest of the world can barely stifle its laughter. That’s like a serial murderer being proud that at some point he stopped murdering people. The world’s language? To some extent true, but through violence, not linguistic merit, and still, more people speak Spanish or Chinese. Britain “invented most of the things worth inventing”? You mean, like gunpowder? Nope. Toothbrush? Nope. Books? Nope. Compass? Nope. Let’s not drag this out. Although, when it comes to pushing the envelope of organized racism and colonial violence, I will give Britain a tip of the hat.

Every sport currently played around the world? You mean, according to your own history books about yourselves. The Chinese were playing a form of football (soccer) 2,500 years ago; Persians were playing polo before Jesus was born; aboriginal peoples in North America were playing lacrosse and hockey since antiquity. Next joke. Setting your words to music? You mean music you lifted from Black US Americans, or you mean your own umpa-lumpa humpty-dumpty stuff with all the dynamic motion of the queen’s hand wave?

(via zuky)

He can shut right up about his History.

(via aragingquiet)